Sports

Mom who gave birth as college athlete competes in US Olympic track and field trials

Mikaila Martin via University of Houston

(NEW YORK) -- When Mikaila Martin competes Thursday at the U.S. Olympic track and field trials in Eugene, Oregon, she will have her biggest fan rooting her on, her 3-year-old daughter Camryn.

Martin, 24, gave birth to Camryn when she was 21 and in the middle of a standout track and field career at the University of Houston.

"I was a junior in college when I gave birth and was on a scholarship for athletics," Martin told ABC News' Good Morning America. "A part of me was worried about it."

Martin, already a record-setting hammer thrower for Houston, put her athletic career on hold when she gave birth to Camryn and redshirted for a year, meaning she sat out one season of eligibility.

After that season was over, Martin jumped right back into being a mom and a student-athlete.

"Before I had Camryn, my day was already hectic," said Martin. "After I had her, I had to sit down with myself and make a schedule of how my day would look like so I could see it on paper."

For the past three years, a typical day for Martin has included waking up around 6 a.m. to take Camryn to an off-campus day care, then going to track practice, followed by a team meeting and then her school classes. At the end of the day, she picks Camryn up, takes her home for dinner and a bath, then does bedtime for Camryn and tackles her own homework.

As a college student, Martin also had to take on a part-time job on the weekends to afford day care for Camryn. She relies on her mom and sister to help care for Camryn while she works, saying, "It really takes a whole village."

During the coronavirus pandemic, Martin took classes on Zoom with Camryn at home, and had to get creative when it came to continuing to train.

"I would find a nearby park and let her play and then put her in the wagon while I did some training," said Martin. "During the pandemic, it was really, really a struggle."

The hard work paid off for Martin both academically and athletically.

She is now completing a graduate degree in human resources and will graduate next May.

Martin finished 12th in the hammer throw at the NCAA outdoor track and field championships earlier this month, which earned her a berth in the U.S. Olympic trials.

She is also the first University of Houston woman to earn All-America honors in the hammer throw.

"My daughter kept me motivated. Every day I got up I was like, 'I'm doing this for her,'" said Martin. "I don't want her to feel like momma couldn't do it. I wanted her to see that I did it."

Martin described Camryn as the "team baby" and said she is a frequent presence on the sidelines at her track and field meets.

"All my teammates just welcomed her in and that's when I was like, 'OK, I'm meant to do this,'" Martin said. "She runs around everywhere and everyone takes her everywhere [at the meets]. She's in heaven."

Will Blackburn, associate head coach for the Houston track and field program, recruited Martin out of high school and has been by her side as she became a mom.

"When we found out she was pregnant, on our side, nothing changed," he said. "We thought, 'Let's go on, let's go after your goals and aspirations.'"

As a coach, Blackburn said he noticed a change in Martin on the field as her life changed away from it.

"I know it was tough on her, no doubt, in part because the time management was totally different," he said. "[After becoming a mom] she had an hour or hour-and-a-half practice time and that was it."

"She was extremely focused and it spilled over into competition," Blackburn added. "Her focus improved a lot and her skill improved greatly."

Martin, who plans to go pro after she finishes graduate school, said she has noticed herself how much she has improved as a hammer thrower since becoming a mom.

"In the beginning, I thought, 'I'm not the same athlete I used to be,' but I learned to work with my body and once I did that, that's when things started to come into play," she said. "And you really are more focused as a mom because before Camryn, I used to be so nervous at track meets, I would shake. Now, I'm so in the zone and focused and I never used to feel like that."

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Scoreboard roundup -- 6/23/21

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(NEW YORK) -- Here are the scores from Wednesday's sports events:

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

INTERLEAGUE
Chi White Sox 4, Pittsburgh 3
Detroit 6, St. Louis 2
Colorado 5, Seattle 2
San Francisco 9, LA Angels 3
Toronto 3, Miami 1

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Houston 13, Baltimore 0
Tampa Bay 8, Boston 2
NY Yankees 6, Kansas City 5
Texas 5, Oakland 3

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Washington 13, Philadelphia 12
Milwaukee 3, Arizona 2
NY Mets 7, Atlanta 3
San Diego 5, LA Dodgers 3

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION PLAYOFFS
Atlanta 116, Milwaukee 113 (Atlanta leads series 1-0)

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE PLAYOFFS
NY Islanders 3 Tampa Bay 2 (OT) (Series tied 3-3)

WOMEN'S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION
Minnesota 87, Atlanta 85

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
New England 3, New York 2
Philadelphia 1, Columbus 0
New York City FC 1, Atlanta 0
Minnesota 2, Austin FC 0
Cincinnati 1, Chicago 0
D.C. United 0, CF Montreal 0 (Tie)
Sporting Kansas City 3, Colorado 1
Portland 2, Houston 2 (Tie)
Nashville 3, Toronto FC 2
Seattle 2, Real Salt Lake 1
Los Angeles FC 2, FC Dallas 0
LA Galaxy 2, Vancouver 1

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


High school basketball coach fired after tortilla-throwing incident

KGTV

(LOS ANGELES) -- A high school basketball coach in California has been fired after tortillas were thrown at the team's predominantly Hispanic opponents after a championship game.

The incident, which was caught on video and sparked outrage, unfolded Saturday evening after Coronado High beat Orange Glen High School in the CIF Southern California Boys Basketball Division 4-A Regional Championship.

Coronado's head basketball coach, JD Laaperi, was fired after a 5-0 vote by the Coronado Unified School Board during an emergency meeting on Tuesday night, a district representative told ABC News.

After the incident, Laaperi issued a statement on Twitter saying, in part, "Unfortunately a community member brought tortillas and distributed them which was unacceptable and racist in nature."

During the Tuesday meeting, school and community members made public comments to the board, condemning the attack.

"None of the players were aware tortillas were brought to the game. The tortillas were brought by someone not associated with the team," said Wayne McKinney, the team's captain. "However, the throwing of the tortillas during the scuffle after the game was unsportsmanlike and inexcusable. On behalf of the team, we apologize for that action. I think many people are making Saturday out to be something that it was not."

Parents also shared their grievances, including Yousef Miller, who said: "Bringing tortillas was racism, plain and simple. We don't need to send these kids to jail. The people behind it need to be investigated and we need to find out who did it. The environment that allowed this to survive is Coronado. There were issues before Saturday."

CUSD Superintendent Karl Mueller denounced the incident in which "members of our community were involved in an altercation and unsportsmanlike conduct, which included throwing tortillas at our visitors from Orange Glen" as "reprehensible."

"We cannot allow anyone in our community to be made to feel unwelcome and we send our deep and sincere apology to the Orange Glen community," Mueller said in a statement on Sunday.

Mueller said in another statement on Tuesday that the district has "initiated immediate action" to address the incident and is working with the Escondido Union High School District to "coordinate experiences which bring students together to facilitate restorative meetings designed to learn and heal from the incident."

The board told ABC News it has no further comment and the investigation is ongoing.

The California Interscholastic Federation also is investigating the incident.

Community activists demanded action after the incident, including the NAACP San Diego Branch, which requested that Coronado share the CIF Title with Orange Glen or be stripped of the regional title, among other measures.

"The distasteful act of tortilla throwing at a basketball game uncovers deep social inequities that are fueled by racism," the organization said in a statement. "Coronado must stop turning a blind eye to racial microaggressions and, in this case, macroaggressions that continue to traumatize students of color within the district and throughout the county."

ABC News' Michelle Mendez contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


High school basketball coach fired after tortilla-throwing incident

(LOS ANGELES) -- A high school basketball coach in California has been fired after tortillas were thrown at the team's predominantly Hispanic opponents after a championship game.

The incident, which was caught on video and sparked outrage, unfolded Saturday evening after Coronado High beat Orange Glen High School in the CIF Southern California Boys Basketball Division 4-A Regional Championship.

Coronado's head basketball coach, JD Laaperi, was fired after a 5-0 vote by the Coronado Unified School Board during an emergency meeting on Tuesday night, a district representative told ABC News.

After the incident, Laaperi issued a statement on Twitter saying, in part, "Unfortunately a community member brought tortillas and distributed them which was unacceptable and racist in nature."

During the Tuesday meeting, school and community members made public comments to the board, condemning the attack.

"None of the players were aware tortillas were brought to the game. The tortillas were brought by someone not associated with the team," said Wayne McKinney, the team's captain. "However, the throwing of the tortillas during the scuffle after the game was unsportsmanlike and inexcusable. On behalf of the team, we apologize for that action. I think many people are making Saturday out to be something that it was not."

Parents also shared their grievances, including Yousef Miller, who said: "Bringing tortillas was racism, plain and simple. We don't need to send these kids to jail. The people behind it need to be investigated and we need to find out who did it. The environment that allowed this to survive is Coronado. There were issues before Saturday."

CUSD Superintendent Karl Mueller denounced the incident in which "members of our community were involved in an altercation and unsportsmanlike conduct, which included throwing tortillas at our visitors from Orange Glen" as "reprehensible."

"We cannot allow anyone in our community to be made to feel unwelcome and we send our deep and sincere apology to the Orange Glen community," Mueller said in a statement on Sunday.

Mueller said in another statement on Tuesday that the district has "initiated immediate action" to address the incident and is working with the Escondido Union High School District to "coordinate experiences which bring students together to facilitate restorative meetings designed to learn and heal from the incident."

The board told ABC News it has no further comment and the investigation is ongoing.

The California Interscholastic Federation also is investigating the incident.

Community activists demanded action after the incident, including the NAACP San Diego Branch, which requested that Coronado share the CIF Title with Orange Glen or be stripped of the regional title, among other measures.

"The distasteful act of tortilla throwing at a basketball game uncovers deep social inequities that are fueled by racism," the organization said in a statement. "Coronado must stop turning a blind eye to racial microaggressions and, in this case, macroaggressions that continue to traumatize students of color within the district and throughout the county."

ABC News' Michelle Mendez contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Here are the 18 US Olympic Women's Soccer Team players heading to Tokyo

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(NEW YORK) -- The 2020 Summer Olympics are just around the corner and the U.S. Women’s National Team has selected the soccer players heading to Tokyo.

Vlatko Andonovski, USWNT’s head coach, announced the names of the 18-player roster for this summer’s Olympic Games on Wednesday. The team includes 11 players who were on the U.S. roster for the 2016 Olympics in Brazil and 17 players who were members of the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup.

“It’s been a long process to get to this point, longer than anyone thought it would be,” Andonovski said in a statement. “But we collected a lot of information on the players over the past year and a half in trainings, in their club matches and in international games and we’re confident that we’ve selected the team with the best chance for success in Japan.”

Soccer star Megan Rapinoe, who led the U.S. Women’s National Team to a World Cup victory in 2019, will be competing at the Olympics with the USWNT for the third time.

For forwards Carli Lloyd and Tobin Heath, the 2020 USWNT is their fourth Olympic team. Lloyd, who will turn 39 next month, is the oldest U.S. Women’s Soccer Olympian, nearly two years older than former captain and 2021 National Soccer Hall of Fame inductee Christie Pearce when she played in the 2012 Olympics.

Also on the team is forward Alex Morgan. The 31-year-old California native previously won gold at the 2012 Olympics and has been on the National Team for 11 years. The 2020 games will be her first Olympics as a mom.

Those heading to the Olympics for the first time include defenders Abby Dahlkemper, Tierna Davidson and Emily Sonnett, goalkeeper Adrianna Franch, midfielders Rose Lavelle and sisters Samantha and Kristie Mewis.

Check out the full list of players heading to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics below:

2020 U.S. Olympic Women’s Soccer Team

Goalkeepers

  • Adrianna Franch
  • Alyssa Naeher

Defenders

  • Abby Dahlkemper
  • Tierna Davidson
  • Crystal Dunn
  • Kelley O’Hara
  • Becky Sauerbrunn
  • Emily Sonnett

Midfielders

  • Julie Ertz
  • Lindsey Horan
  • Rose Lavelle
  • Kristie Mewis
  • Samantha Mewis

Forwards

  • Tobin Heath
  • Carli Lloyd
  • Alex Morgan
  • Christen Press
  • Megan Rapinoe

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


WNBA players continue history of activism with support for voting rights

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(NEW YORK) -- Members of the WNBA wore special T-shirts during games Tuesday to show support for passing expansive voting rights legislation, like the For The People Act.

Players wore T-shirts with the slogans like “Freedom to Vote” and “Protect Our Freedom to Vote,” along with advocating for expanded voting rights on their social media channels.

Republicans on Tuesday, however, blocked the Senate from moving forward on the sweeping elections reform bill in a 50-50 vote along party lines. The bill fell 10 votes short of the 60 needed under Senate rules to advance legislation.

"We have several serious options for how to reconsider this issue and advance legislation to combat voter suppression," Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said on the Senate floor Tuesday. "We are going to explore every last one of our options. We have to. Voting rights are too important. ..."

Despite Republicans blocking the voting rights legislation, WNBA players will continue with their voting rights advocacy. Tuesday's activism is part of a larger partnership between the Women's National Basketball Players Association (WNBPA) and the Rock the Vote organization called the Freedom to Vote Campaign, which seeks to galvanize young people to rally for expanded voting rights. It aims to reach more than five million youth.

WNBPA Executive Director Terri Carmichael Jackson said the shirts represent a “source of strength” that occurs when WNBA players rally behind a cause en masse.

“[WNBA] fans and followers know that these professional athletes actually dig in deep and do the work to get informed about issues before they step out there and make a statement,” Jackson told ABC News. “They make a statement so proudly, and so boldly and so visibly with those T-shirts.”

Rock the Vote President Carolyn DeWitt said the purpose of activism throughout gameday is to build awareness about the precarity of voting rights in the United States.

“It's after the election, most people are busy with their daily lives," DeWitt told ABC News. "They aren't necessarily aware that these extremist politicians are trying to put up barriers to silence voices, based on what we look like or where we live.'

“And so this is the beginning of an effort to really amplify this assault on our freedom to vote so that voters are really aware of what's going on,” she added.

This is not the first time the players of the WNBA have used their platforms to undertake both personal and unified missions related to social justice.

Maya Moore said she would be stepping away from her career in 2019 to help exonerate Johnathan Irons, who she said was wrongly convicted, and to promote criminal justice reform.

The WNBA announced in 2020 that it would be dedicating its season to Breonna Taylor, a Black woman who was shot and killed by Louisville, Kentucky police officers earlier that year. Later that year, players from the Atlanta Dream wore shirts supporting Democrat Raphael Warnock for senator, an overt snub to the team’s co-owner and incumbent Republican Sen. Kelly Loeffler, who had been outspoken against the Black Lives Matter movement.

Though well-versed in social justice matters, WNBA players encounter unique obstacles in their advocacy work, according to Defector Media sports reporter Maitreya Anantharaman.

“They are, as women athletes, in a more precarious place than some of their male counterparts in that they don't necessarily enjoy the same levels of public support and are certainly not as financially well compensated,” Anantharaman told ABC News.

Anantharaman, however, said this lesser visibility does allow WNBA players to be more vocal about social issues than their male counterparts.

“It also means [WNBA players] might not have considerations like endorsement deals or quite so much of a spotlight on them, so I think they can work in ways that feel comfortable for them and don't have to be hyper-concerned with managing your image in a way that an NBA star might have to,” she said.

“They have the capacity to speak out and to speak up for those issues. It's in their DNA. That is who they are. That is what they do,” Jackson said.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Scoreboard roundup -- 6/22/21

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(NEW YORK) -- Here are the scores from Tuesday's sports events:

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

INTERLEAGUE
Cincinnati 10, Minnesota 7
Toronto 2, Miami 1
Pittsburgh 6, Chi White Sox 3
Detroit 8, St. Louis 2
Chi Cubs 7, Cleveland 1
San Francisco 5 L.A. Angels 0
Seattle 2, Colorado 1

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Houston 3, Baltimore 1
Kansas City 6, NY Yankees 5
Oakland 13, Texas 6
Boston 9, Tampa Bay 5

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Atlanta 3, N.Y. Mets 0
Washington 3, Philadelphia 2
Milwaukee 5 Arizona 0
San Diego 3, LA Dodgers 2

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION PLAYOFFS
Phoenix 104, LA Clippers 103 (Phoenix leads series 2-0)

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE PLAYOFFS
Montreal 4, Vegas 1 (Montreal leads series 3-2)

WOMEN'S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION
Chi 92, New York 72
Connecticut 80, Dallas 70
Washington 87, Seattle 83

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
Orlando City 5, San Jose 0

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


NCAA hands down punishments against Creighton men's basketball, former assistant coach, for violations

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(OMAHA, Neb.) -- Creighton University's men's basketball program was handed down a series of punishments on Tuesday, as part of an NCAA investigation into rules violations.

The NCAA report found that former Blue Jays assistant coach Preston Murphy was given a two-year show-cause penalty for accepting improper payments. Murphy was accused of having accepted a $6,000 payment from an undercover FBI agent during a 2017meeting with Christian Dawkins, one of the individuals at the center of the FBI's investigation into corruption within college basketball. Upon accepting that money, Murphy alleged agreed to steer student-athletes to Dawkins' management company.

Murphy later resigned in 2019. His lawyers argued that Murphy had returned the money after the meeting.

The NCAA Committee on Infractions said that Murphy lied about accepting payments from an agent or financial adviser in the school's internal questionnaire. He later informed head coach Greg McDermott about the meeting, and McDermott informed athletic director Bruce Rasmussen.

In a statement, Creighton University points out that these are the first infractions in the long history in Division One sports.

"There is no postseason penalty imposed on the men's basketball program," the school also notes, "and none of our current or future student-athletes will be impacted."

The report goes on to say that Rasmussen investigated the incident without involving the compliance department at Creighton.

"The violations largely stem from individuals permitting personal relationships to cloud their judgment and influence their decision-making," the committee said. "Specifically, the assistant coach prioritized loyalty to his friend, the agent associate; and the athletics director looked past alarming conduct based on his trust in the assistant coach."

Punishments levied against the school include a reduction in the budget for the men's basketball program, and two years of probation. Creighton had previously self-imposed a loss of one scholarship for the next two years.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Washington Spirit's Kumi Yokoyama comes out as transgender man

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(NEW YORK) -- Kumi Yokoyama, a forward for the National Women's Soccer League's Washington Spirit and the Japanese national team, came out as a transgender man in a video posted to YouTube by fellow footballer Yuki Nagasato on Sunday.

Yokoyama, who uses they/them pronouns, said they were encouraged to share their story after living in the United States and Germany.


Minnesota Vikings rookie injured in shooting, expected to recover

Photo by Joe Sargent/Getty Images

(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Minnesota Vikings rookie Jaylen Twyman was one of several people injured in a shooting in Washington, D.C. on Monday, the team said.

Twyman's agent, Drew Rosenhaus, told ESPN that Twyman was reportedly in a vehicle when he was shot four times -- in the arm, leg, buttocks and shoulder. He is expected to be released from the hospital this week.

"There doesn't appear to be any long-term injuries that would prohibit him from playing this season," Rosenhaus said.

"Wrong place, wrong time," Rosenhaus added, noting that Twyman was in Washington to visit a family member. "In talking to him today, he's going to be okay -- that's all that matters. We're thankful he's okay. He will make a full recovery."

The 21-year-old defensive lineman suffered superficial exit wounds, but Rosenhaus says he will not need surgery.


New York Mets' deGrom continues remarkable run of dominance

Photo by Scott Clarke / ESPN Images

(NEW YORK) -- New York Mets ace Jacob deGrom continued his domination on Monday, shutting down the Atlanta Braves for five innings as he returned to the mound after another injury scare.

Showcasing his 100+ mph fastball on a day where his slider wasn't at its best, deGrom struck out six Braves and surrendered just one hit. Already a two-time Cy Young Award winner, deGrom has taken his game to a new level early in 2021.

Through 12 starts, deGrom's ERA sits at a miniscule 0.50. He has given up just four earned runs all season, while driving in six at the plate.

Having pitched 30 consecutive innings without giving up a run, deGrom has battled through a series of seemingly minor health issues -- including tightness in his side, a back issue, soreness in his elbow, and most recently shoulder tightness.

Through 72 innings, deGrom has allowed just 27 hits in 2021, and walked just ten batters. By comparison, he has struck out 117 of the 250 hitters he's faced.

He's slated to make his next start on Saturday against the Philadelphia Phillies.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


England pair to sit out Euro match due to COVID-19 protocols

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(NEW YORK) -- A pair of England soccer players have been ruled out of Thursday's Euro 2020 match against the Czech Republic due to COVID-19 protocols.

Mason Mount and Ben Chilwell were deemed "close contacts" with Billy Gilmour, a club teammate of the pair at Chelsea. Gilmour tested positive for the virus following Friday's 0-0 draw between England and Scotland.

ESPN says Mount and Chilwell were seen embracing and talking to Gilmour after the Friday match, crossing the threshold of what Public Health England deems a close contact.

Mount and Chilwell could also be forced to sit out England's next match, which would be in the Round of 16, after having to self-isolate. The Football Association says the two will be able to train individually in private areas of the English team's training base.

England has already assured that it will advance out of the group stage, but could top their group with a win over the Czech Republic. With a win, they would next play on June 29, allowing Mount and Chilwell to return. A second-place finish within the group, though, would force them to play on Monday without Mount and Chilwell, who would be in their final day of isolation.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Scoreboard roundup -- 6/21/21

iStock

(NEW YORK) -- Here are the scores from Monday's sports events:

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

INTERLEAGUE
Cleveland 4, Chi Cubs 0
Minnesota 7, Cincinnati 5

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Houston 10, Baltimore 2
Texas 8, Oakland 3

NATIONAL LEAGUE
NY Mets 4, Atlanta 2
Atlanta 1, N.Y. Mets 0
Arizona 5, Milwaukee 1
San Diego 6, LA Dodgers 2

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE PLAYOFFS
Tampa Bay 8, NY Islanders 0 (Tampa Bay leads series 3-2)

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Carl Nassib comes out as first gay active NFL player

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(NEW YORK) -- NFL player Carl Nassib made history Monday by announcing that he's gay. He's the first active player to come out publicly in league history.

The Las Vegas Raiders defensive end posted a video from his home in Pennsylvania revealing his sexual orientation and said he's been meaning to announce for a long time.

"I'm a pretty private person, so I hope you guys know that I’m really not doing this for attention. I just think that representation and visibility are so important," he said in the video.

The post also contained more words in the form of screenshots of notes where Nassib, 28, talked about his journey. He said he was sitting in a "moment of gratitude and relief."

"Sadly, I have agonized over this moment for the last 15 years. Only until recently, thanks to my family and friends... did it seem possible for me to say publicly and proudly that I'm gay," he wrote.

Nassib thanked his family, coaches and teammates for the support through the years and said he "was greeted with the utmost respect and acceptance."

He also used his post to promote awareness for suicide prevention in the LGTBQ community. Nassib said he was donating $100,000 to The Trevor Project, which is an organization for suicide prevention for LGBTQ+ youth.

Nassib said that younger LGTBQ children are five times more likely than straight children to consider suicide.

"For someone like me, who has been so lucky and cherishes every day, it brings me incredible sadness to think that our LGTBQ youth are at such an elevated risk for suicide," he wrote.

Nassib added that studies have shown that "all it takes is on accepting adult to decrease the risk of an LGBTQ kid attempting suicide by 40%."

"Whether you're a friend, a parent, a coach or a teammate, you can be that person," he said.

The NFL confirmed to ABC News Tuesday that the league will match Carl Nassib’s $100,000 pledge to The Trevor Project. The news was first reported by Outsports earlier in the day.

He encouraged others to donate to The Trevor Project and included a link in his Instagram bio.

Amit Paley, the Trevor Project's CEO and executive director, said in a statement that the organization was grateful for Nassib's support and message.

“LGBTQ representation matters because it gives LGBTQ youth the chance to envision a bright future and dream of possibilities," Paley said in the statement. "We hope this historic moment for the NFL will foster LGBTQ inclusion in professional sports and inspire young LGBTQ athletes across the country to pursue their talents.”

Nassib's message made an immediate impact on the non-profit, according to a spokesperson for The Trevor Project. Traffic to the website jumped by 350% on Tuesday, Kevin Wong, the non-profit's vice president of communications told ABC News.

"We've seen a 50% increase in our daily online donations since the announcement yesterday, and some of the donations even have heartwarming notes referencing Carl's coming out, showing acceptance for LGBTQ young people, and supporting LGBTQ youth mental health," he said.

"The NFL family is proud of Carl for courageously sharing his truth today. Representation matters," NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said in a statement Monday night. "We share his hope that someday soon statements like his will no longer be newsworthy as we march toward full equality for the LGBTQ+ community. We wish Carl the best of luck this coming season."

The Raiders responded to the post with heart emojis and later put out a tweet with screenshots of Nassib's post.

"Proud of you, Carl," the team tweeted with a heart emoji.

The NFL also shared Nassib's video on its Twitter page with the message, "The NFL family is proud of you, Carl," with a heart emoji.

“Carl Nassib’s powerful coming out is a historic reflection of the growing state of LGBTQ visibility and inclusion in the world of professional sports, which has been driven by a long list of brave LGBTQ athletes who came before him,” GLAAD President & CEO Sarah Kate Ellis said in a statement Monday.

University of Missouri defensive end Michael Sam came out as gay in 2014 before the St. Louis Rams drafted him, however, the team cut him during the preseason. He went on to play football in Canada for a year before retiring in 2015.

On Tuesday, Sam thanked Nassib on Twitter for his message and donation to The Trevor Project.

"I hope and pray people will take note to this. Thank you again Carl and look forward to seeing you play on the field," he tweeted.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


Supreme Court rules against NCAA caps on student athlete education-related gifts and benefits

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(WASHINGTON) -- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled against the NCAA in a long-running dispute over a cap on education-related gifts and benefits that schools may provide student-athletes.

The unanimous decision, upholding lower court rulings, says the cap on a relatively narrow list of education-related benefits -- such as scholarships for graduate school, computers, musical instruments, and tutoring expenses -- violates federal anti-trust law and must be lifted.

The legal victory for the athletes deals a blow to the NCAA's longstanding policy of strictly limiting compensation beyond free tuition, room and board, but stops short of a sweeping decision allowing salaries for college athletes.

Justice Neil Gorsuch, writing the majority opinion, concluded "that relaxing these restrictions would not blur the distinction between college and professional sports and thus impair demand" among consumers, as argued by the NCAA.

"By permitting colleges and universities to offer enhanced education-related benefits, [the lower court's decision] may encourage scholastic achievement and allow student-athletes a measure of compensation more consistent with the value they bring to their schools," Gorsuch wrote.

"Still, some will see this as a poor substitute for fuller relief. At the same time, others will think the district court went too far by undervaluing the social benefits associated with amateur athletics," he continued. "For our part, though, we can only agree with the Ninth Circuit [US Court of Appeals]: 'The national debate about amateurism in college sports is important. But our task as appellate judges is not to resolve it.'"

The case is one of the biggest tests in decades for the NCAA and its limits on athlete compensation, and critics said it could begin to dramatically alter the nature of college sports.

"We're thrilled with the decision. It opens the door for further challenges to the NCAA's biased compensation practices. It knocks out the NCAA defense," said Steve Berman, co-lead counsel for the group of former athletes that brought the case.

"The NCAA has for years claimed it was above the law," added Berman. "And this opinion not only sustains our victory but makes it clear going forward that the NCAA rules can be challenged like any other business rule."

The practical implication of the Supreme Court's decision, he said, is that colleges and universities will now be able to woo athletes with education-related benefits unfettered. "The door's wide open," Berman said.

In response to the ruling, the NCAA said it retained the authority to maintain compensation limits beyond educational benefits and would preserve the character of college sports, even as efforts are underway to allow student-athletes to profit off of their name, image and likeness in endorsement deals.

“Even though the decision does not directly address name, image and likeness, the NCAA remains committed to supporting NIL benefits for student-athletes,” said NCAA President Mark Emmert, referring to the association's 2020 policy decision. “Additionally, we remain committed to working with Congress to chart a path forward, which is a point the Supreme Court expressly stated in its ruling.”

The case was brought by a group of former NCAA Division 1 football and basketball players who accused the athletic conference of violating federal anti-trust laws by capping at $5,000 the amount of education-related benefits schools could provide.

The NCAA had argued that lifting the cap risks opening the floodgates to other compensation and eroding amateurism in athletics. Attorneys for the players said they are considering broadening their challenge to the policy with future litigation.

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